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Archive for August, 2011

Alive and Well, but Very Busy!

August 25, 2011 Leave a comment

I just wanted to drop a note to let everyone know that I am alive and still working on this blog. This year I’m lucky enough to attend VMworld in Las Vegas. Its been a busy few weeks planning my event schedule, and meetings with vendors and fellow Virtualization Enthusiast. I will do my best to post each night about my daily events. I know things have been quiet around here. I have also been settling into my new role and starting to get involved in some projects, including a complete migration to ESXi on vSphere 4.1U1.

Now that I’m getting settled in, I plan on putting more time back into this blog to continue to share knowledge and the experiences I deal with during my current and future projects. I’ll also be absorbing as much info as I can at VMworld so I can pass on some of the knowledge and all the experiences I have at this amazing event.

Thanks again for your continued support of this endeavor.

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Categories: General Tags: , , , ,

VMware Listens! New Licensing Model Released

August 4, 2011 Leave a comment

VMware has made some much-needed modifications to the new licensing model. After reviewing the new licensing layout, I think I’m happy with it. This is what I thought VMware was originally moving to with the announcement of vRAM based licensing before the first set of numbers came out.

The changes VMware has made include the following:

  • Increased vRAM entitlement for all vSphere editions
  • Capped the amount of vRAM that is counted for one VM
  • Adjusted model to not penalize for short-term spikes and use averages to determine true-up vRAM entitlement.

Lets touch on each of these big points. The first about the increased vRAM entitlement. VMware has increased the entitlements for ALL versions of vSphere, including doubling the entitlement for Enterprise (64GB) and Enterprise Plus (96GB.) This is huge and was the big gripe for everyone, especially myself given our specific environment. Our new blades were going to require 4 Enterprise Plus licenses per blade with the old model, and now will only require 2, meaning we see no additional cost in licensing. And I think this will apply to most people, where licensing cost will be increased none, or just a little for monster servers. This should please most of the people who were up in arms.

Secondly is the vRAM entitlement cap per VM. This may throw some people off so let me break it down. Let’s say you have a large VM, running 1TB of vRAM on the VM. Well VMware will cap the amount of vRAM it penalizes you for at 96GB, meaning that no matter how much vRAM you use over that 96GB, that VM wont cost you more than 1 Enterprise Plus License. This is also big, because the second biggest concern was how the old vRAM model would impact the virtualization of large workloads.

Lastly, the fact that VMware has changed to an average model for vRAM entitlement in relation to licensing true up is great. VMware will now use an average over 12 months to determine what your vRAM entitlement is for your environment. While the impact on Production environments may be small, Test and Dev environments grow and shrink so dramatically that the old vRAM model would have killed companies over licensing due to spikes. Sure these spikes will still push the average up, but I do think it’s fair that it does impact your cost some. If you use the vRAM, you should have to pay a little more. But I think its much better than the high water mark to determine your entitlement. No need getting dinged on vRAM in a dev environment when you use it for a day or two.

All and all, I think VMware has listened to their customers and responded appropriately. This model still follows the heart of the original change, to move to vRAM entitlement, which I still feel is a great model. However, the original model was flawed and VMware has realized that, and adjusted that model to keep their customers happy, and treat them fairly. I am very happy that VMware has made these changes, and I think the community will respond positively to the new model. Kudos to VMware for listening.

Categories: VMware Tags: , , , ,